Lunar Module at Tranquility Base


This photograph of the Lunar Module at Tranquility Base was taken by Neil Armstrong during the Apollo 11 mission, from the rim of Little West Crater on the lunar surface. Armstrong's shadow and the shadow of the camera are visible in the foreground. This is the furthest distance from the lunar module traveled by either astronaut while on the moon. via NASA http://ift.tt/2tiLhDM

IC 1396: Emission Nebula in Cepheus


Stunning emission nebula IC 1396 mixes glowing cosmic gas and dark dust clouds in the high and far off constellation of Cepheus. Energized by the bright central star seen here, this star forming region sprawls across hundreds of light-years, spanning over three degrees on the sky while nearly 3,000 light-years from planet Earth. Among the intriguing dark shapes within IC 1396, the winding Elephant's Trunk nebula lies just below center. Stars could still be forming inside the dark shapes by gravitational collapse. But as the denser clouds are eroded away by powerful stellar winds and radiation, any forming stars will ultimately be cutoff from the reservoir of star stuff. The gorgeous color view is a composition of image data from narrowband filters, mapping emission from the nebula's atomic oxygen, hydrogen, and sulfur into blue, green, and red hues. via NASA http://ift.tt/2vgKUex

This Just In: Pablo Sandoval says he has interest from a few teams but waiting until Friday to make decision (ESPN)

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Giants finalizing deal to sign Pablo Sandoval to minor-league contract - reports (ESPN)

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▶ Buster Posey delivers pinch-hit, go-ahead double in 8th inning of 5-4 win over Indians (ESPN)

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Final: Giants 5 Indians 4. WP: SF C Gearrin (4-3) LP: CLE B Shaw (2-4) (ESPN)

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July 14 Solar Flare and a Coronal Mass Ejection


A medium-sized (M2) solar flare and a coronal mass ejection erupted from the same, large active region of the sun on July 14, 2017. The flare lasted almost two hours, quite a long duration. The coils arcing over this active region are particles spiraling along magnetic field lines. via NASA http://ift.tt/2uJ7lf4

F/10: Giants 2 Indians 1. WP: SF S Dyson (2-7) LP: CLE C Allen (0-5) (ESPN)

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Ireson Hill on Mars


What created this unusual hill on Mars? Its history has become a topic of research, but its shape and two-tone structure makes it one of the more unusual hills that the robotic Curiosity rover on Mars has rolled near. Dubbed Ireson Hill, the mound rises about 5 meters high and spans about 15 meters across. Ireson Hill is located on the Bagnold Dune field on the slope of Mount Sharp in Gale Crater on Mars. The featured 41-image panorama has been horizontally compressed to include the entire hill. The image was taken on February 2 and released last week. Because Mars is moving behind the Sun as seen from the Earth, NASA will soon stop sending commands to its Martian orbiters and rovers until about August 1. via NASA http://ift.tt/2uCRIpD

Rumor Central: Giants' Jeff Samardzija, Hunter Strickland generating trade interest - San Francisco Chronicle (ESPN)

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NASA Evaluates How Crew Will Exit Orion Spacecraft


When astronauts return to Earth from destinations beyond the moon in NASA’s Orion spacecraft and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, they’ll still need to safely get out of the spacecraft and back on dry land. Using the waters off the coast of Galveston, a NASA and Department of Defense team tested Orion exit procedures on July 10-14, 2017. via NASA http://ift.tt/2vefiGn

Thunder Moon over Pisa


What's wrong with this picture? If you figure it out, you may then realize where the image was taken. The oddity lies actually in one of the buildings -- it leans. The Leaning Tower of Pisa has been an iconic legend since shortly after its construction began in the year 1173. Now part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site, folklore holds that Galileo used the leaning tower to dramatically demonstrate the gravitational principle that objects of different mass fall the same. Between the Leaning Tower of Pisa on the right and Pisa Cathedral and the Pisa Baptistery on the left, a full "Thunder" moon was visible last week when the image was taken. Using modern analyses, the tower has been successfully stabilized and, barring the unexpected, should hold its present tilt for the next 200 years. via NASA http://ift.tt/2vtTvJQ

Final: Indians 5 Giants 3. WP: CLE J Tomlin (6-9) LP: SF M Moore (3-10) SV: CLE C Allen (17) (ESPN)

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NASA Langley and the Space Race


Neil Armstrong trained for the Apollo 11 mission at NASA Langley's Lunar Landing Research Facility on equipment that cancelled all but one-sixth of Earth's gravitational force. Armstrong offered perhaps the greatest tribute to the importance of his training when asked what it was like to land on the moon, replying, "Like Langley." via NASA http://ift.tt/2tjeylH

Lightning Eclipse from the Planet of the Goats


Thunderstorms almost spoiled this view of the spectacular 2011 June 15 total lunar eclipse. Instead, storm clouds parted for 10 minutes during the total eclipse phase and lightning bolts contributed to the dramatic sky. Captured with a 30-second exposure the scene also inspired one of the more memorable titles (thanks to the astrophotographer) in APOD's now 22-year history. Of course, the lightning reference clearly makes sense, and the shadow play of the dark lunar eclipse was widely viewed across planet Earth in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia. The picture itself, however, was shot from the Greek island of Ikaria at Pezi. That area is known as "the planet of the goats" because of the rough terrain and strange looking rocks. via NASA http://ift.tt/2vnh0Eo

Final: Padres 5 Giants 3. WP: SD B Maurer (1-4) LP: SF C Gearrin (3-3) (ESPN)

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MLB: Giants P Madison Bumgarner allows 3 R over 7 IP at Padres in first start since April dirt bike accident (ESPN)

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Giants place Johnny Cueto (blisters) on 10-day DL (ESPN)

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Giants must take wrecking ball to lineup at trade deadline - Joe Peta (ESPN)

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NGC 4449: Close up of a Small Galaxy


(xxxedit and linkxxx) Grand spiral galaxies often seem to get all the glory. Their young, blue star clusters and pink star forming regions along sweeping spiral arms are guaranteed to attract attention. But small irregular galaxies form stars too, like NGC 4449, about 12 million light-years distant. Less than 20,000 light-years across, the small island universe is similar in size, and often compared to our Milky Way's satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This remarkable Hubble Space Telescope close-up of the well-studied galaxy was reprocessed to highlight the telltale reddish glow of hydrogen gas. The glow traces NGC 4449's widespread star forming regions, some even larger than those in the LMC, with enormous interstellar arcs and bubbles blown by short-lived, massive stars. NGC 4449 is a member of a group of galaxies found in the constellation Canes Venatici. It also holds the distinction of being the first dwarf galaxy with an identified tidal star stream. via NASA http://ift.tt/2ugs7Sm

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot (Enhanced Color)


This enhanced-color image of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Gerald Eichst√§dt using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA’s Juno spacecraft. via NASA http://ift.tt/2tQeNll

Full Moon and Boston Light


This well-planned telephoto timelapse captures July's Full Moon rise across outer Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, planet Earth. In the foreground, the historic terrestrial beacon is known as Boston Light. July's Full Moon is known to some as a Thunder Moon, likely a reference to the sounds of the northern summer month's typically stormy weather. But the eastern sky was clear for this video sequence. Near the horizon, the long sight-line through atmospheric layers filters and refracts the moonlight, causing the rising Moon's reddened color, ragged edges and distorted shape. via NASA http://ift.tt/2t2FdmP

Giants Poll: Belt, Posey or Samardzija? Who's your pick for MVP of the first half? Vote now! (ESPN)

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Looking Back: Aircraft Engineering Research Conference at Langley's Full Scale Tunnel, 1934


This year, NASA is celebrating the 100th anniversary of the agency’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. In Langley's early years of crafting flight, aviation pioneers flocked to the center for engineering conferences. This photo was taken in Langley's Full Scale Tunnel during the 1934 Aircraft Engineering Research Conference. via NASA http://ift.tt/2sQ4IDO

Messier 63: The Sunflower Galaxy


A bright spiral galaxy of the northern sky, Messier 63 is about 25 million light-years distant in the loyal constellation Canes Venatici. Also cataloged as NGC 5055, the majestic island universe is nearly 100,000 light-years across. That's about the size of our own Milky Way Galaxy. Known by the popular moniker, The Sunflower Galaxy, M63 sports a bright yellowish core in this sharp composite image from space- and ground-based telescopes. Its sweeping blue spiral arms are streaked with cosmic dust lanes and dotted with pink star forming regions. A dominant member of a known galaxy group, M63 has faint, extended features that are likely star streams from tidally disrupted satellite galaxies. M63 shines across the electromagnetic spectrum and is thought to have undergone bursts of intense star formation. via NASA http://ift.tt/2v5Wecs

Lakes and Rivers Have Ice, Too


On May 29, 2017, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this image of ice covering the Amundsen Gulf, Great Bear Lake, and numerous small lakes in the northern reaches of Canada’s Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Icy lakes and rivers make a significant footprint on the Arctic landscape. via NASA http://ift.tt/2tJZ0om

Giants: Madison Bumgarner (shoulder) finishes rehab, ready to start Saturday against Padres (ESPN)

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Star Cluster Omega Centauri in HDR


Behold the largest ball of stars in our galaxy. Omega Centauri is packed with about 10 million stars, many older than our Sun and packed within a volume of only about 150 light-years in diameter. The star cluster is the largest and brightest of 200 or so known globular clusters that roam the halo of our Milky Way galaxy. Though most star clusters consist of stars with the same age and composition, the enigmatic Omega Cen exhibits the presence of different stellar populations with a spread of ages and chemical abundances. In fact, Omega Cen may be the remnant core of a small galaxy merging with the Milky Way. The featured image shows so many stars because it merged different exposures with high dynamic range (HDR) techniques. Omega Centauri, also known as NGC 5139, lies about 15,000 light-years away toward the southern constellation of the Centaurus. via NASA http://ift.tt/2tFFKIl

Giants: Eduardo Nunez (hamstring) expected to return to lineup Friday vs. Padres (ESPN)

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Dawn’s Early Light


The light of a new day on Saturn illuminates the planet’s wavy cloud patterns and the smooth arcs of the vast rings. via NASA http://ift.tt/2sWYfeq

Spiral Galaxy NGC 1512: The Nuclear Ring


What's happening around the center of this spiral galaxy? Seen in total, NGC 1512 appears to be a barred spiral galaxy -- a type of spiral that has a straight bar of stars across its center. This bar crosses an outer ring, though, a ring not seen as it surrounds the pictured region. Featured in this Hubble Space Telescope image is an inner ring -- one that itself surrounds the nucleus of the spiral. The two rings are connected not only by a bar of bright stars but by dark lanes of dust. Inside of this inner ring, dust continues to spiral right into the very center -- possibly the location of a large black hole. The rings are bright with newly formed stars which may have been triggered by the collision of NGC 1512 with its galactic neighbor, NGC 1510. via NASA http://ift.tt/2tVECTF

F/11: Marlins 10 Giants 8. WP: MIA N Wittgren (2-1) LP: SF G Kontos (0-3) SV: MIA A Ramos (17) (ESPN)

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Final: Marlins 5 Giants 4. WP: MIA C O'Grady (1-0) LP: SF J Samardzija (4-10) SV: MIA A Ramos (16) (ESPN)

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Earth at Night


Can you find your favorite country or city? Surprisingly, on this world-wide nightscape, city lights make this task quite possible. Human-made lights highlight particularly developed or populated areas of the Earth's surface, including the seaboards of Europe, the eastern United States, and Japan. Many large cities are located near rivers or oceans so that they can exchange goods cheaply by boat. Particularly dark areas include the central parts of South America, Africa, Asia, and Australia. The featured composite was created from images that were collected during cloud-free periods in April and October 2012 by the Suomi-NPP satellite, from a polar orbit about 824 kilometers above the surface, using its Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). via NASA http://ift.tt/2sX5LkD

Giants Video: Barry Bonds throws out first pitch before being added to team's Wall of Fame (ESPN)

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Final: Marlins 6 Giants 1. WP: MIA D Straily (7-4) LP: SF M Moore (3-9) (ESPN)

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Hidden Galaxy IC 342


Similar in size to large, bright spiral galaxies in our neighborhood, IC 342 is a mere 10 million light-years distant in the long-necked, northern constellation Camelopardalis. A sprawling island universe, IC 342 would otherwise be a prominent galaxy in our night sky, but it is hidden from clear view and only glimpsed through the veil of stars, gas and dust clouds along the plane of our own Milky Way galaxy. Even though IC 342's light is dimmed by intervening cosmic clouds, this sharp telescopic image traces the galaxy's own obscuring dust, blue star clusters, and glowing pink star forming regions along spiral arms that wind far from the galaxy's core. IC 342 may have undergone a recent burst of star formation activity and is close enough to have gravitationally influenced the evolution of the local group of galaxies and the Milky Way. via NASA http://ift.tt/2uwQnx4

Winds Trigger Pond Growth


Wind is a force to be reckoned with. It can stir up monsoons, carry dust thousands of miles, and sculpt rock into sinuous arches. But sometimes, the effects of wind go unnoticed for years, like when it carves away slowly at the edges of a pond. via NASA http://ift.tt/2suFpH8

A View Toward M106


Big, bright, beautiful spiral, Messier 106 dominates this cosmic vista. The two degree wide telescopic field of view looks toward the well-trained constellation Canes Venatici, near the handle of the Big Dipper. Also known as NGC 4258, M106 is about 80,000 light-years across and 23.5 million light-years away, the largest member of the Canes II galaxy group. For a far away galaxy, the distance to M106 is well-known in part because it can be directly measured by tracking this galaxy's remarkable maser, or microwave laser emission. Very rare but naturally occuring, the maser emission is produced by water molecules in molecular clouds orbiting its active galactic nucleus. Another prominent spiral galaxy on the scene, viewed nearly edge-on, is NGC 4217 below and right of M106. The distance to NGC 4217 is much less well-known, estimated to be about 60 million light-years. via NASA http://ift.tt/2tKWlNp

Vice President Mike Pence Visits Kennedy Space Center


Vice President Mike Pence addresses NASA employees, Thursday, July 6, 2017, at the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Cape Canaveral, Florida. via NASA http://ift.tt/2sRRqpn

Final: Tigers 6 Giants 2. WP: DET A Sanchez (1-0) LP: SF C Stratton (0-2) (ESPN)

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Giants: Johnny Cueto scratched from Thursday's start vs. Tigers due to an inner ear infection (ESPN)

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Giants Video: Madison Bumgarner allows 8 runs and 3 homers in 4th inning of Wednesday's Class A rehab start (ESPN)

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Final: Giants 5 Tigers 4. WP: SF T Blach (6-5) LP: DET D Norris (4-7) SV: SF S Dyson (3) (ESPN)

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This Week in NASA History: Apollo AS-203 Launches -- July 5, 1966


This week in 1966, the AS-203 rocket launched from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. The Apollo AS-203 mission was an uncrewed test of the vehicle’s second stage, the S-IVB stage, and the instrument unit of the Saturn V to obtain flight information under orbital conditions. via NASA http://ift.tt/2sFZqP6

Aphelion Sunrise


On July 3rd, planet Earth reached aphelion, the farthest point in its elliptical orbit around the Sun. Each year, this day of the most distant Sun happens to occur during winter in the southern hemisphere. That's where this aphelion sunrise from 2015 was captured in a time series composite against the skyline of Brisbane, Australia. Of course, seasons for our fair planet are not determined by distance to the Sun, but by the tilt of Earth's rotational axis with respect to the ecliptic, the plane of its orbit. Fondly known as the obliquity of the ecliptic, the angle of the tilt is about 23.4 degrees from perpendicular to the orbital plane. So the most distant sunrise occurs during northern summer, when the planet's north pole is tilted toward the Sun and the north enjoys longer, warmer days. via NASA http://ift.tt/2ulvNQp

Final: Tigers 5 Giants 3. WP: DET M Fulmer (8-6) LP: SF M Cain (3-8) (ESPN)

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Happy Fourth of July From the Space Station


NASA astronauts Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson celebrated the Fourth of July from over 250 miles above Earth on the International Space Station. Fischer shared this photo on social media and said, "We sometimes have issues standing up straight, but we have no problems at all showing our American pride-Happy 4th!" via NASA http://ift.tt/2umrzrV

Dragon Returns Space Station Science to Earth


NASA astronaut Jack Fischer photographed the SpaceX Dragon capsule as it reentered Earth's atmosphere before splashing down in the Pacific Ocean west of Baja California at 8:12 a.m. EDT, July 3, 2017. Fischer commented, "Beautiful expanse of stars-but the “long” orange one is SpaceX-11 reentering!" via NASA http://ift.tt/2t9KQy8

The Summer Triangle over the Great Wall


Have you ever seen the Summer Triangle? The bright stars Vega, Deneb, and Altair form a large triangle on the sky that can be seen rising in the northern spring during the morning, and rising in the northern fall during the evening. During summer months, the triangle can be found nearly overhead near midnight as three of the brightest stars on the sky. Featured here, along with the arch of the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy, the Summer Triangle asterism was captured this spring over the Great Wall of China. This part of the Great Wall, a World Culture Heritage Site, was built during the 6th century on the Yan Mountains. At the summit is Wangjinglou Tower from which, on a clear night, the lights of Beijing are visible in the distance. via NASA http://ift.tt/2udOcP0

Giants: Buster Posey named NL All-Star starter (ESPN)

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Giants Video: Brandon Belt launches 2-run homer in 8th inning of 5-3 win over Pirates (ESPN)

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Final: Giants 5 Pirates 3. WP: SF J Samardzija (4-9) LP: PIT T Watson (4-2) SV: SF S Dyson (2) (ESPN)

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Mountains of Dust in the Carina Nebula


It's stars versus dust in the Carina Nebula and the stars are winning. More precisely, the energetic light and winds from massive newly formed stars are evaporating and dispersing the dusty stellar nurseries in which they formed. Located in the Carina Nebula and known informally as Mystic Mountain, these pillar's appearance is dominated by the dark dust even though it is composed mostly of clear hydrogen gas. Dust pillars such as these are actually much thinner than air and only appear as mountains due to relatively small amounts of opaque interstellar dust. About 7,500 light-years distant, the featured image was taken with the Hubble Space Telescope and highlights an interior region of Carina which spans about three light years. Within a few million years, the stars will likely win out completely and the entire dust mountain will evaporate. via NASA http://ift.tt/2uvhGqS

F/11: Giants 2 Pirates 1. WP: SF J Osich (2-1) LP: PIT D Hudson (1-4) SV: SF S Dyson (1) (ESPN)

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Giants recall P Chris Stratton from Triple-A Sacramento; option RHP Dan Slania (ESPN)

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Giants: Minor-league P Joan Gregorio suspended for rest of season after testing positive for performance-enhancing substances (ESPN)

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NGC 7814: The Little Sombrero in Pegasus


Point your telescope toward the high flying constellation Pegasus and you can find this expanse of Milky Way stars and distant galaxies. Dominated by NGC 7814, the pretty field of view would almost be covered by a full moon. NGC 7814 is sometimes called the Little Sombrero for its resemblance to the brighter more famous M104, the Sombrero Galaxy. Both Sombrero and Little Sombrero are spiral galaxies seen edge-on, and both have extensive halos and central bulges cut by a thin disk with thinner dust lanes in silhouette. In fact, NGC 7814 is some 40 million light-years away and an estimated 60,000 light-years across. That actually makes the Little Sombrero about the same physical size as its better known namesake, appearing smaller and fainter only because it is farther away. Very faint dwarf galaxies, potentially a satellites of NGC 7814, have been discovered in deep exposures of Little Sombrero. via NASA http://ift.tt/2tn1Cun

Giants: 3B Jae-Gyun Hwang in line for payday if he remains on roster for rest of season (ESPN)

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MLB Rank: Giants' Madison Bumgarner voted as No. 25 overall player in baseball by ESPN's experts (ESPN)

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Starry Night and Aurora


Expedition 52 Flight Engineer Jack Fischer of NASA photographed the glowing nighttime lights of an aurora from his vantage point in the International Space Station's cupola module on June 19, 2017. Part of the station's solar array is also visible. via NASA http://ift.tt/2s5Udf4

Giants Video: Experience rookie Jae-Gyun Hwang's 1st MLB hit, a HR, in both English and his native Korean (ESPN)

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Symbiotic R Aquarii


A long recognized naked-eye variable star, R Aquarii is actually an interacting binary star system, two stars that seem to have a close, symbiotic relationship. About 710 light years away, it consists of a cool red giant star and hot, dense white dwarf star in mutual orbit around their common center of mass. The binary system's visible light is dominated by the red giant, itself a Mira-type long period variable star. But material in cool giant star's extended envelope is pulled by gravity onto the surface of the smaller, denser white dwarf, eventually triggering a thermonuclear explosion and blasting material into space. Optical image data (red) shows the still expanding ring of debris originating from a blast that would have been seen in the early 1770s. The evolution of less understood energetic events producing high energy emission in the R Aquarii system has been monitored since 2000 using Chandra X-ray Observatory data (blue). The composite field of view is less that a light-year across at the estimated distance of R Aquarii. via NASA http://ift.tt/2tjifHw

Giants Video: Jae-Gyun Hwang's first MLB hit is a go-ahead HR in 6th inning of 5-3 win over Rockies (ESPN)

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Final: Giants 5 Rockies 3. WP: SF T Blach (5-5) LP: COL K Freeland (8-6) (ESPN)

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Giants: Mark Melancon placed on 10-day DL with right forearm strain; recall P Dan Slania (ESPN)

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The Niagara Falls of Mars


Various researchers are often pre-occupied with the quest for flowing water on Mars. via NASA http://ift.tt/2shuEvD

Composite Messier 20 and 21


The beautiful Trifid Nebula, also known as Messier 20, lies about 5,000 light-years away, a colorful study in cosmic contrasts. It shares this nearly 1 degree wide field with open star cluster Messier 21 (top left). Trisected by dust lanes the Trifid itself is about 40 light-years across and a mere 300,000 years old. That makes it one of the youngest star forming regions in our sky, with newborn and embryonic stars embedded in its natal dust and gas clouds. Estimates of the distance to open star cluster M21 are similar to M20's, but though they share this gorgeous telescopic skyscape there is no apparent connection between the two. M21's stars are much older, about 8 million years old. M20 and M21 are easy to find with even a small telescope in the nebula rich constellation Sagittarius. In fact, this well-composed scene is a composite from two different telescopes. Using narrowband data it blends a high resolution image of M20 with a wider field image extending to M21. via NASA http://ift.tt/2tdOffI

Giants: Mark Melancon, Bruce Bochy say no turmoil in clubhouse over bullpen stretching (ESPN)

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As the Sun Rises, NASA's Global Hawk is Being Prepared for Flight


Hot summer days in Southern California’s Antelope Valley force many aircraft operations to start early in the morning before the sun rises. On a back ramp at Armstrong Flight Research Center on Edwards Air Force Base, a NASA Global Hawk goes through testing of its communication components and satellite connection links in preparation for flight. via NASA http://ift.tt/2sX9zUG

Final: Giants 9 Rockies 2. WP: SF J Samardzija (3-9) LP: COL G Marquez (5-4) (ESPN)

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The M81 Galaxy Group through the Integrated Flux Nebula


Distant galaxies and nearby nebulas highlight this deep image of the M81 Group of galaxies. First and foremost in this 80-exposure mosaic is the grand design spiral galaxy M81, the largest galaxy in the image, visible on the lower right. M81 is gravitationally interacting with M82 just above it, a large galaxy with an unusual halo of filamentary red-glowing gas. Around the image many other galaxies from the M81 Group of galaxies can be seen, as well as many foreground Milky Way stars. This whole galaxy menagerie is seen through the glow of an Integrated Flux Nebula (IFN), a vast and complex screen of diffuse gas and dust also in our Milky Way Galaxy. Details of the red and yellow IFN, digitally enhanced, were imaged by a new wide-field camera recently installed at the Teide Observatory in the Canary Islands of Spain. via NASA http://ift.tt/2t7WOsw

Giants Video: Brandon Belt smacks RBI triple off center-field wall to extend lead over Rockies (ESPN)

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MLB: Rockies aim for 10th straight win over Giants when teams meet at AT&T Park; watch live in the ESPN App (ESPN)

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Saturnian Dawn


NASA's Cassini spacecraft peers toward a sliver of Saturn's sunlit atmosphere while the icy rings stretch across the foreground as a dark band. via NASA http://ift.tt/2sIzUaw

Artistic Impression: The Surface of TRAPPIST 1f


If you could stand on the surface of the newly discovered Earth-sized exoplanet TRAPPIST-1f, what would you see? Presently, no Earthling knows for sure, but the featured illustration depicts a reasoned guess based on observational data taken by NASA's Sun-orbiting Spitzer Space Telescope. In 2017, four more Earth-sized planets were found by Spitzer, including TRAPPIST-1f, in addition to three discovered in 2015 from the ground. From the planet's surface, near the mild terminator between night and day, you might see water, ice, and rock on the ground, while water-based clouds might hover above. Past the clouds, the small central star TRAPPIST-1 would appear more red than our Sun, but angularly larger due to the close orbit. With seven known Earth-sized planets -- many of which pass near each other -- the TRAPPIST-1 system is not only a candidate to have life, but intercommunicating life -- although a preliminary search has found no obvious transmissions. via NASA http://ift.tt/2u2C9mW

Final: Mets 8 Giants 2. WP: NYM R Montero (1-4) LP: SF M Moore (3-8) (ESPN)

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The N44 Superbubble


What created this gigantic hole? The vast emission nebula N44 in our neighboring galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud has a large, 250 light-year hole and astronomers are trying to figure out why. One possibility is particle winds expelled by massive stars in the bubble's interior that are pushing out the glowing gas. This answer was found to be inconsistent with measured wind velocities, however. Another possibility is that the expanding shells of old supernovas have sculpted the unusual space cavern. An unexpected clue of hot X-ray emitting gas was recently been detected escaping the N44 superbubble. The featured image was taken in three very specific colors by the huge 8-meter Gemini South Telescope on Cerro Pachon in Chile. via NASA http://ift.tt/2t1javD

Final: Mets 5 Giants 2. WP: NYM J deGrom (7-3) LP: SF S Dyson (1-7) (ESPN)

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Giants: Madison Bumgarner (shoulder) scheduled to throw 3 innings in rookie league rehab start Sunday (ESPN)

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Giants designate Aaron Hill for assignment; 3B Ryder Jones called up from Triple-A (ESPN)

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Final: Mets 11 Giants 4. WP: NYM S Lugo (2-1) LP: SF T Blach (4-5) (ESPN)

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Hubble Uses Gravitational Lens to Capture Disk Galaxy


By combining the power of a "natural lens" in space with the capability of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers made a surprising discovery—the first example of a compact yet massive, fast-spinning, disk-shaped galaxy that stopped making stars only a few billion years after the big bang. via NASA http://ift.tt/2t2PLCd

Solstice Conjunction over Budapest


Before a solstice Sun rose on June 21, brilliant Venus and an old crescent Moon posed together over Budapest, Hungary for this predawn skyscape. In the foreground the view looks across the Danube river from Buda to Pest toward the dome and peaks of the Hungarian Parliament building. Low clouds are in silhouette against a twilight sky. But far enough above the eastern horizon to catch the sunlight shines another seasonal apparition on that solstice morning, noctilucent clouds. Seen near sunrise and sunset in summer months at high latitudes, the night-shining clouds are formed as water vapor in the cold upper atmosphere condenses on meteoric dust or volcanic ash near the edge of space. via NASA http://ift.tt/2sSU41V

Final: Braves 12 Giants 11. WP: ATL J Hursh (1-0) LP: SF M Cain (3-7) SV: ATL J Johnson (14) (ESPN)

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The White Cliffs of 'Rover'


This image was acquired by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on April 18, 2017, at 14:04 local Mars time. It reminded the HiRISE team of the rugged and open terrain of a stark shore-line, perhaps of the British Isles. via NASA http://ift.tt/2rGyUke

Northern Summer on Titan


While yesterday's solstice brought summer to planet Earth's northern hemisphere, a northern summer solstice arrived for ringed planet Saturn nearly a month ago on May 24. Following the Saturnian seasons, its large moon Titan was captured in this Cassini spacecraft image from June 9. The near-infrared view finds bright methane clouds drifting through Titan's northern summer skies as seen from a distance of about 507,000 kilometers. Below Titan's clouds, dark hydrocarbon lakes sprawl near the large moon's now illuminated north pole. via NASA http://ift.tt/2sRQmGr

F/11: Braves 5 Giants 3. WP: ATL L Jackson (2-0) LP: SF C Gearrin (1-2) (ESPN)

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Visualization of the August 21, 2017 Total Solar Eclipse


On August 21, 2017, the Earth will cross the shadow of the moon, creating a total solar eclipse. Eclipses happen about every six months, but this one is special. For the first time in almost 40 years, the path of the moon's shadow passes through the continental United States. via NASA http://ift.tt/2rRirhl

A Sundial that Shows Solstice


What day is it? If the day -- and time -- are right, this sundial will tell you: SOLSTICE. Only then will our Sun be located just right for sunlight to stream through openings and spell out the term for the longest and shortest days of the year. But this will happen today (and again in December). The sundial was constructed by Jean Salins in 1980 and is situated at the Ecole Supérieure des Mines de Paris in Valbonne Sophia Antipolis of south-eastern France. On two other days of the year, watchers of this sundial might get to see it produce another word: EQUINOXE. via NASA http://ift.tt/2rz8BMB

Final: Giants 6 Braves 3. WP: SF M Moore (3-7) LP: ATL J Teheran (6-5) SV: SF M Melancon (11) (ESPN)

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Giants: 3B Eduardo Nunez out of Tuesday's game, will get MRI on hamstring; Bruce Bochy hopes Nunez can avoid DL (ESPN)

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Deployment of the Space Station's Roll Out Solar Array Experiment


Over the weekend of June 17-18, engineers on the ground remotely operated the International Space Station's Canadarm2 to extract the Roll Out Solar Array experiment from the SpaceX Dragon resupply ship. The experiment will remain attached to the Canadarm2 over seven days to test this advanced, flexible array that rolls out like a tape measure. via NASA http://ift.tt/2tp28oW

The Massive Stars in Westerlund 1


Star cluster Westerlund 1 is home to some of the largest and most massive stars known. It is headlined by the star Westerlund 1-26, a red supergiant star so big that if placed in the center of our Solar System, it would extend out past the orbit of Jupiter. Additionally, the young star cluster is home to 3 other red supergiants, 6 yellow hypergiant stars, 24 Wolf-Rayet stars, and several even-more unusual stars that continue to be studied. Westerlund 1 is relatively close-by for a star cluster at a distance of 15,000 light years, giving astronomers a good laboratory to study the development of massive stars. The featured image of Westerlund 1 was taken by the Hubble Space Telescope toward the southern constellation of the Altar (Ara). Although presently classified as a "super" open cluster, Westerlund 1 may evolve into a low mass globular cluster over the next billion years. via NASA http://ift.tt/2rvPUJT

Final: Braves 9 Giants 0. WP: ATL R Dickey (5-5) LP: SF J Cueto (5-7) (ESPN)

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Giants: Hunter Strickland's six-game suspension upheld by MLB; will begin serving Monday vs. Braves (ESPN)

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Rumor Central: Giants have no plans to trade closer Mark Melancon - Bay Area News Group (ESPN)

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Webb Telescope Set for Testing in Space Simulation Chamber


NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope sits in front of the door to Chamber A, a giant thermal vacuum chamber located at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. The telescope will soon be moved into the chamber, where it will spend a hot Houston summer undergoing tests at sub-freezing cryogenic temperatures. via NASA http://ift.tt/2sKRZWE

Saturn near Opposition


Saturn reached its 2017 opposition on June 16. Of course, opposition means opposite the Sun in Earth's sky and near opposition Saturn is up all night, at its closest and brightest for the year. This remarkably sharp image of the ringed planet was taken only days before, on June 11, with a 1-meter telescope from the mountain top Pic du Midi observatory. North is at the top with the giant planet's north polar storm and curious hexagon clearly seen bathed in sunlight. But Saturn's spectacular ring system is also shown in stunning detail. The narrow Encke division is visible around the entire outer A ring, small ringlets can be traced within the fainter inner C ring, and Saturn's southern hemisphere can be glimpsed through the wider Cassini division. Near opposition Saturn's rings also appear exceptionally bright, known as the opposition surge or Seeliger Effect. Directly illuminated from Earth's perspective, the ring's icy particles cast no shadows and strongly backscatter sunlight creating the dramatic increase in brightness. Still, the best views of the ringed planet are currently from the Saturn-orbiting Cassini spacecraft. Diving close, Cassini's Grand Finale orbit number 9 is in progress. via NASA http://ift.tt/2rmLBAm