Final: Dodgers 4 Giants 2. WP: LAD R Hill (11-8) LP: SF J Samardzija (9-15) SV: LAD K Jansen (40) (ESPN)

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Soaring Over Jupiter


This striking image of Jupiter was captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft as it performed its eighth flyby of the gas giant planet. via NASA http://ift.tt/2xzDw1k

Rumor Central: Giants scouting Japanese star Shohei Otani - San Francisco Chronicle (ESPN)

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X-plane Preliminary Design Model Tests Quiet Supersonic Technology


Test Engineer Samantha O’Flaherty finalizes the set-up of the Quiet Supersonic Technology (QueSST) Preliminary Design Model inside the 14- by- 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The QueSST Preliminary Design is the initial design stage of NASA’s planned Low-Boom Flight Demonstration experimental airplane, or X-plane. via NASA http://ift.tt/2w9GhD4

A September Morning Sky


The Moon, three planets, and a bright star gathered near the ecliptic plane in the September 18 morning sky over Veszprem Castle, Hungary. In this twilight skyscape, Mercury and Mars still shine close to the eastern horizon, soon to disappear in the glare of the Sun. Regulus, alpha star of the constellation Leo, is the bright point next to a waning crescent Moon, with brilliant Venus near the top of the frame. The beautiful morning conjunction of Moon, planets, and bright star could generally be followed by early morning risers all around planet Earth. But remarkably, the Moon also occulted, or passed directly in front of, Regulus and each of the three planets within 24 hours, all on September 18 UT. Visible from different locations, timing and watching the lunar occultations was much more difficult though, and mostly required viewing in daytime skies. via NASA http://ift.tt/2xhaqlg

Final: Giants 4 Rockies 0. WP: SF M Moore (6-14) LP: COL T Chatwood (8-13) (ESPN)

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Suomi NPP Satellite Captures Thermal Image of Hurricane Maria


The VIIRS instrument on NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite captured a thermal image of Hurricane Maria on Sept. 20 at 2:12 a.m. EDT. The image showed very cold cloud top temperatures in the powerful thunderstorms in Maria’s eyewall. Maria’s eye was just east of the American Virgin Islands, and its northwestern quadrant stretched over Puerto Rico. via NASA http://ift.tt/2xn5mNK

Final: Giants 4 Rockies 3. WP: SF S Dyson (4-8) LP: COL C Rusin (5-1) (ESPN)

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The Big Corona


Most photographs don't adequately portray the magnificence of the Sun's corona. Seeing the corona first-hand during a total solar eclipse is unparalleled. The human eye can adapt to see coronal features and extent that average cameras usually cannot. Welcome, however, to the digital age. The featured picture is a combination of forty exposures from one thousandth of a second to two seconds that, together, were digitally combined and processed to highlight faint features of the total solar eclipse that occurred in August of 2017. Clearly visible are intricate layers and glowing caustics of an ever changing mixture of hot gas and magnetic fields in the Sun's corona. Looping prominences appear bright pink just past the Sun's limb. Faint details on the night side of the New Moon can even be made out, illuminated by sunlight reflected from the dayside of the Full Earth. via NASA http://ift.tt/2hbq0KU

▶ Hunter Pence comes up clutch with 9th-inning sac fly for 4-3 walk-off win over Rockies (ESPN)

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Northern Lights Over Canada


The spectacular aurora borealis, or the “northern lights,” over Canada is sighted from the International Space Station near the highest point of its orbital path. The station’s main solar arrays are seen in the left foreground. This photograph was taken by a member of the Expedition 53 crew aboard the station on Sept. 15, 2017. via NASA http://ift.tt/2xNXbeZ

Veil Nebula: Wisps of an Exploded Star


Wisps like this are all that remain visible of a Milky Way star. About 7,000 years ago that star exploded in a supernova leaving the Veil Nebula. At the time, the expanding cloud was likely as bright as a crescent Moon, remaining visible for weeks to people living at the dawn of recorded history. Today, the resulting supernova remnant, also known as the Cygnus Loop, has faded and is now visible only through a small telescope directed toward the constellation of the Swan (Cygnus). The remaining Veil Nebula is physically huge, however, and even though it lies about 1,400 light-years distant, it covers over five times the size of the full Moon. The featured picture is a Hubble Space Telescope mosaic of six images together covering a span of only about two light years, a small part of the expansive supernova remnant. In images of the complete Veil Nebula, even studious readers might not be able to identify the featured filaments. via NASA http://ift.tt/2fckF5B

Long Way From Home


This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon - the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft - was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA's Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles (11.66 million kilometers) from Earth. The moon is at the top of the picture and beyond the Earth as viewed by Voyager. via NASA http://ift.tt/2fe9adV

Bright Spiral Galaxy M81


One of the brightest galaxies in planet Earth's sky is similar in size to our Milky Way Galaxy: big, beautiful M81. This grand spiral galaxy can be found toward the northern constellation of the Great Bear (Ursa Major). This superbly detailed view reveals M81's bright yellow nucleus, blue spiral arms, and sweeping cosmic dust lanes with a scale comparable to the Milky Way. Hinting at a disorderly past, a remarkable dust lane actually runs straight through the disk, to the left of the galactic center, contrary to M81's other prominent spiral features. The errant dust lane may be the lingering result of a close encounter between M81 and its smaller companion galaxy, M82. Scrutiny of variable stars in M81 has yielded one of the best determined distances for an external galaxy -- 11.8 million light-years. via NASA http://ift.tt/2x9X8bS

Final: Diamondbacks 2 Giants 0. WP: ARI Z Greinke (17-6) LP: SF M Bumgarner (3-9) SV: ARI F Rodney (38) (ESPN)

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Final: Diamondbacks 3 Giants 2. WP: ARI R Ray (14-5) LP: SF J Samardzija (9-14) SV: ARI F Rodney (37) (ESPN)

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Cassini End of Mission


Cassini program manager at JPL, Earl Maize, left, and spacecraft operations team manager for the Cassini mission at Saturn, Julie Webster embrace after the Cassini spacecraft plunged into Saturn, Friday, Sept. 15, 2017 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. via NASA http://ift.tt/2foCj37

100 Steps Forward


A beautiful conjunction of Venus and Moon, human, sand, and Milky Way is depicted in this night skyscape from planet Earth. The scene is a panorama of 6 photos taken in a moment near the end of a journey. In the foreground, footsteps along the wind-rippled dunes are close to the Huacachina oasis in the southwestern desert of Peru. An engaging perspective on the world at night, the stunning final image was also chosen as a winner in The World at Night's 2017 International Earth and Sky Photo Contest. via NASA http://ift.tt/2wYuhaU

Orion Parachutes Measure Up in High Pressure Test


Orion’s three main orange and white parachutes help a representative model of the spacecraft descend through sky above Arizona, where NASA engineers tested the parachute system on Sept. 13, 2017, at the U.S. Army Proving Ground in Yuma. NASA is qualifying Orion’s parachutes for missions with astronauts. via NASA http://ift.tt/2xBoGYR

Flare Well AR2673


Almost out of view from our fair planet, rotating around the Sun's western edge giant active region AR2673 lashed out with another intense solar flare followed by a large coronal mass ejection on September 10. The flare itself is seen here at the right in an extreme ultraviolet image from the sun-staring Solar Dynamics Observatory. This intense flare was the fourth X-class flare from AR2673 this month. The active region's most recent associated coronal mass ejection collided with Earth's magnetosphere 2 days later. Say farewell to the mighty AR2673, for now. For the next two weeks, the powerful sunspot group will be on the Sun's far side. via NASA http://ift.tt/2xwBDDn

Final: Dodgers 4 Giants 1. WP: LAD Y Darvish (9-12) LP: SF M Moore (5-14) (ESPN)

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Dreamy Swirls on Saturn


NASA's Cassini spacecraft gazed toward the northern hemisphere of Saturn to spy subtle, multi-hued bands in the clouds there. via NASA http://ift.tt/2jppZUF

NGC 6334: The Cats Paw Nebula


Nebulas are perhaps as famous for being identified with familiar shapes as perhaps cats are for getting into trouble. Still, no known cat could have created the vast Cat's Paw Nebula visible in Scorpius. At 5,500 light years distant, Cat's Paw is an emission nebula with a red color that originates from an abundance of ionized hydrogen atoms. Alternatively known as the Bear Claw Nebula or NGC 6334, stars nearly ten times the mass of our Sun have been born there in only the past few million years. Pictured here is a deep field image of the Cat's Paw Nebula in light emitted by hydrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. via NASA http://ift.tt/2wUOfn6

Final: Dodgers 5 Giants 3. WP: LAD C Kershaw (17-3) LP: SF J Cueto (7-8) SV: LAD K Jansen (37) (ESPN)

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Expedition 53 Launches to the International Space Station


The Soyuz MS-06 spacecraft launches with Expedition 53 crewmembers Joe Acaba of NASA, Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos, and Mark Vande Hei of NASA from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017, (Kazakh time) (Sept. 12, U.S. time). via NASA http://ift.tt/2wYcZs9

Expedition 53 Crew Waves Farewell


Expedition 53 flight engineer Mark Vande Hei of NASA, top, flight engineer Joe Acaba of NASA, and Soyuz Commander Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos, bottom, wave farewell before boarding their Soyuz MS-06 spacecraft for launch, Tuesday, Sept. 12. Launch is scheduled at 5:17 p.m. EDT. via NASA http://ift.tt/2xizkTr

Calm Waters and Geomagnetic Storm


Very recognizable stars of the northern sky are a backdrop for calm waters in this moonlit sea and skyscape off Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Taken on September 7, the photo also records a colorful display of northern lights or aurora borealis triggered by a severe geomagnetic storm. Visible crossing the Sun, the giant solar active region responsible, AR 2673, is much larger than planet Earth. It has produced the strongest flare of the current solar cycle and and the Earth-directed coronal mass ejection in the last few days. via NASA http://ift.tt/2gRH9cN

▶ Pablo Sandoval snaps 39 at-bat drought with massive 3-run HR in 9-2 win vs. White Sox (ESPN)

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Final: Giants 9 White Sox 2. WP: SF M Moore (5-13) LP: CHW L Giolito (2-2) (ESPN)

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Giants: Mark Melancon to undergo season-ending forearm surgery Tuesday (ESPN)

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Rumor Central: Giants likely to pick up Matt Moore's option - San Francisco Chronicle (ESPN)

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Geocolor Image of Hurricane Irma


The NOAA-NASA satellite GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of Hurricane Irma passing the eastern end of Cuba at about 8:00 a.m. EDT, Sept. 8, 2017. Created by NOAA's partners at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, the experimental imagery enhancement displays geostationary satellite data in different ways for day or night. via NASA http://ift.tt/2wf8UxT

The Great Gig in the Sky


There were no crowds on the beach at Phillips Lake, Oregon on August 21. But a few had come there to stand, for a moment, in the dark shadow of the Moon. From the beach, this unscripted mosaic photo records their much anticipated solar eclipse. In two vertical panels it catches the last few seconds of totality and the first instant of 3rd contact, just as the eclipse ends and sunlight faintly returns. Across the US those gathered along the path of totality also took pictures and shared their moment. And like those at Phillips Lake they may treasure the experience more than any planned or unplanned photograph of the total eclipse of the Sun. via NASA http://ift.tt/2vND1kt

Staggering Structure


This view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft shows a wave structure in Saturn's rings known as the Janus 2:1 spiral density wave. via NASA http://ift.tt/2gKui8n

▶ Joe Panik smacks 5 hits, drives in 2 runs during 11-3 win over Rockies (ESPN)

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Final: Giants 11 Rockies 3. WP: SF J Cueto (7-7) LP: COL K Freeland (11-10) (ESPN)

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Prospecting from Orbit


The combination of morphological and topographic information from stereo images from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. via NASA http://ift.tt/2xOVHxu

Expedition 53 Qualification Exams


Expedition 53 crew members: Joe Acaba of NASA, left, Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos, center, and Mark Vande Hei of NASA answer questions from the press outside the Soyuz simulator ahead of their Soyuz qualification exams, Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017 at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. via NASA http://ift.tt/2wHF3zZ

The Climber and the Eclipse


What should you do if your rock climbing picture is photobombed by a total eclipse of the Sun? Rejoice -- because your planning paid off. After months of considering different venues, and a week of scouting different locations in Oregon's Smith Rock State Park, a group of photographers and rock climbers led by Ted Hesser, Martina Tibell, and Michael Shainblum settled on picturesque 100-meter tall Monkey Face tower as the dramatic foreground for their images of the pending total solar eclipse. Tension mounted as the eclipse time approached, planned juxtapositions were scrutinized, and the placement of rock climber Tommy Smith was adjusted. Right on schedule, though, the Moon moved in front of the Sun, and Smith moved in front of the Moon, just as planned. The solar eclipse image displayed here actually shows a diamond ring, an eclipse phase when a bit of the distant Sun is still visible beyond the Moon's surface. via NASA http://ift.tt/2vIebmd

Final: Rockies 9 Giants 6. WP: COL C Rusin (4-0) LP: SF T Blach (8-12) SV: COL G Holland (37) (ESPN)

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Voyager 1 Launches Aboard Titan III/Centaur


The Voyager 1 aboard the Titan III/Centaur lifted off on September 5, 1977, joining its sister spacecraft, the Voyager 2, on a mission to the outer planets. via NASA http://ift.tt/2gJoEad

▶ Barry Bonds hits 762nd and final homer of career on Sept. 5, 2007 (ESPN)

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Saturns Rings from the Inside Out


What do Saturn's rings look like from Saturn? Images from the robotic spacecraft Cassini are providing humanity with this unprecedented vantage point as it nears the completion of its mission. Previous to Cassini's Grand Finale orbits, all images of Saturn's majestic ring system were taken from outside of the rings looking in. Pictured in the inset is the remarkable video, while the spacecraft's positions are depicted in the surrounding animation. Details of the complex rings are evident as the short time-lapse sequence begins, while the paper-thin thickness of the rings becomes apparent near the video's end. The featured images were taken on August 20. Cassini has only a few more orbits around Saturn left before it is directed to dive into the giant planet on September 15. via NASA http://ift.tt/2gtDrSt

Final: Cardinals 7 Giants 3. WP: STL L Weaver (4-1) LP: SF M Bumgarner (3-7) (ESPN)

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A Waterspout in Florida


What's happening over the water? Pictured here is one of the better images yet recorded of a waterspout, a type of tornado that occurs over water. Waterspouts are spinning columns of rising moist air that typically form over warm water. Waterspouts can be as dangerous as tornadoes and can feature wind speeds over 200 kilometers per hour. Some waterspouts form away from thunderstorms and even during relatively fair weather. Waterspouts may be relatively transparent and initially visible only by an unusual pattern they create on the water. The featured image was taken in 2013 July near Tampa Bay, Florida. The Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida is arguably the most active area in the world for waterspouts, with hundreds forming each year. Some people speculate that waterspouts are responsible for some of the losses recorded in the Bermuda Triangle. via NASA http://ift.tt/2xFhdVC

▶ Giants fan flips kayak, soaks cooler, loses drinks while trying to get foul ball in McCovey Cove (ESPN)

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▶ Nick Hundley hits 2nd career walk-off HR, solo shot in 10th tops Cardinals 2-1 (ESPN)

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F/10: Giants 2 Cardinals 1. WP: SF S Dyson (3-8) LP: STL R Sherriff (0-1) (ESPN)

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Final: Cardinals 5 Giants 2. WP: STL M Wacha (10-7) LP: SF M Cain (3-11) SV: STL S Oh (20) (ESPN)

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A First Glimpse of the Great American Eclipse


Making landfall in Oregon, the Moon's dark umbral shadow toured the United States on August 21. Those gathered along its coast to coast path were witness to a total eclipse of the Sun, possibly the most widely shared celestial event in history. But first, the Moon's shadow touched the northern Pacific and raced eastward toward land. This dramatic snapshot was taken while crossing the shadow path 250 miles off the Oregon coast, 45,000 feet above the cloudy northern Pacific. Though from a shorter totality, it captures the eclipse before it could be seen from the US mainland. With the eclipsed Sun not far above, beautiful colors appear along the western horizon giving way to a clear, pitch-black, stratospheric sky in the shadow of the Moon. via NASA http://ift.tt/2wUvjFu

Giants scratch Madison Bumgarner (flu) from Thursday's game; Matt Cain will start instead (ESPN)

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Giants: Buster Posey (thumb) back in lineup Thursday vs. Cardinals after missing 3 games (ESPN)

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NASA Concludes Summer of Testing with Fifth Flight Controller Hot Fire


NASA engineers closed a summer of successful hot fire testing Aug. 30 for flight controllers on RS-25 engines that will help power the new Space Launch System (SLS) rocket being built to carry astronauts to deep-space destinations, including Mars. via NASA http://ift.tt/2xyYAm6

Giants: Johnny Cueto (forearm) will be activated from DL, start Friday vs. Cardinals - report (ESPN)

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Lunar View, Solar Eclipse


Orbiting above the lunar nearside on August 21, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter turned to look back on a bright, Full Earth. As anticipated its Narrow Angle Camera scanned this sharp view of our fair planet, catching the shadow of the Moon racing along a path across the United States at about 1,500 miles per hour. In fact, the dark lunar shadow is centered over Hopkinsville, Kentucky at 1:25:30 Central Daylight Time. From there, the New Moon blocked the Sun high in clear skies for about 2 minutes and 40 seconds in a total solar eclipse. via NASA http://ift.tt/2wHTJRS

Final: Padres 5 Giants 0. WP: SD C Stammen (2-2) LP: SF T Blach (8-11) SV: SD B Hand (14) (ESPN)

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NASA's IceBridge Surveys Glaciers in Northeast Greenland


NASA's Operation IceBridge is flying its summer Arctic land ice campaign in Greenland, continuing its measurements of the Greenland Ice Sheet and its outlet glaciers. This photograph from the mission was taken on Aug. 29, 2017, from 28,000 feet, looking north while surveying Nioghalvfjerdsbrae (79 N) Glacier in northeast Greenland. via NASA http://ift.tt/2x5KGKi

Panoramic Eclipse Composite with Star Trails


What was happening in the sky during last week's total solar eclipse? This featured little-planet, all-sky, double time-lapse, digitally-fused composite captured celestial action during both night and day from a single location. In this 360x180 panorama, north and south are at the image bottom and top, while east and west are at the left and right edges, respectively. During four hours the night before the eclipse, star trails were captured circling the north celestial pole (bottom) as the Earth spun. During the day of the total eclipse, the Sun was captured every fifteen minutes from sunrise to sunset (top), sometimes in partial eclipse. All of these images were then digitally merged onto a single image taken exactly during the total solar eclipse. Then, the Sun's bright corona could be seen flaring around the dark new Moon (upper left), while Venus simultaneously became easily visible (top). The tree in the middle, below the camera, is a Douglas fir. The images were taken with care and planning at Magone Lake in Oregon, USA. via NASA http://ift.tt/2gmKrnN

Final: Padres 6 Giants 3. WP: SD L Perdomo (7-8) LP: SF M Moore (4-13) SV: SD B Hand (13) (ESPN)

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Aug. 29, 1965 - Gemini V Crew Returns to Earth


Gemini V command pilot Gordon Cooper (right) and Charles "Pete" Conrad, pilot, walk across the deck of the aircraft carrier USS Lake Champlain following their spacecraft's recovery from the ocean on Aug. 29, 1965. The eight-day Gemini V endurance mission doubled America's spaceflight record set two months earlier. via NASA http://ift.tt/2x1awPF

▶ Jeff Samardzija strikes out 5 in 3-hit shutout against Padres (ESPN)

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Final: Giants 3 Padres 0. WP: SF J Samardzija (9-12) LP: SD J Chacin (11-10) (ESPN)

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Supersonic Flight Campaign Continues at Kennedy Space Center


A NASA F-18 jet takes off from the agency's Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Aug. 23, 2017. The F-18 jets fly at supersonic speeds while agency researchers measure the effects of low-altitude turbulence caused by sonic booms, part of NASA's Sonic Booms in Atmospheric Turbulence, or SonicBAT II Program. via NASA http://ift.tt/2xGKj62

A Fleeting Double Eclipse of the Sun


Last week, for a fraction of a second, the Sun was eclipsed twice. One week ago today, many people in North America were treated to a standard, single, partial solar eclipse. Fewer people, all congregated along a narrow path, experienced the eerie daytime darkness of a total solar eclipse. A dedicated few with fast enough camera equipment, however, were able to capture a double eclipse -- a simultaneous partial eclipse of the Sun by both the Moon and the International Space Station (ISS). The Earth-orbiting ISS crossed the Sun in less than a second, but to keep the ISS from appearing blurry, exposure times must be less than 1/1000th of a second. The featured image composite captured the ISS multiple times in succession as it zipped across the face of the Sun. The picture was taken in a specific color emitted by hydrogen which highlights the Sun's chromosphere, a layer hotter and higher up than the usually photographed photosphere. via NASA http://ift.tt/2wShbvy

Final: Diamondbacks 11 Giants 0. WP: ARI P Corbin (12-11) LP: SF C Stratton (2-3) (ESPN)

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The Heart Nebula in Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Sulfur


What powers the Heart Nebula? The large emission nebula dubbed IC 1805 looks, in whole, like a heart. The nebula's glow -- as well as the shape of the gas and dust clouds -- is powered by by stellar winds and radiation from massive hot stars in the nebula's newborn star cluster Melotte 15. This deep telescopic image maps the pervasive light of narrow emission lines from atoms of hydrogen, oxygen, and sulfur in the nebula. The field of view spans just over two degrees on the sky, so that it appears larger than four times the diameter of a full moon. The cosmic heart is found in the constellation of Cassiopeia, the boastful mythical Queen of Aethiopia . via NASA http://ift.tt/2vg24fJ

Final: Diamondbacks 2 Giants 1. WP: ARI T Walker (7-7) LP: SF M Bumgarner (3-6) SV: ARI F Rodney (32) (ESPN)

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Final: Diamondbacks 4 Giants 3. WP: ARI Z Greinke (15-6) LP: SF T Blach (8-10) (ESPN)

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Hurricane Harvey, Seen From the Cupola of the International Space Station


On August 25, 2017, NASA astronaut Jack Fischer photographed Hurricane Harvey from the cupola module aboard the International Space Station as it intensified on its way toward the Texas coast. The Expedition 52 crew on the station has been tracking this storm for the past two days and capturing Earth observation photographs and videos. via NASA http://ift.tt/2wOiueR

📷 Here's the full list of nickname jerseys Giants players are wearing for MLB Players Weekend (ESPN)

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Diamond Ring in a Cloudy Sky


As the Moon's shadow swept across the US on August 21, eclipse chasers in the narrow path of totality were treated to a diamond ring in the sky. At the beginning and end of totality, the fleeting and beautiful effect often produces audible gasps from an amazed audience. It occurs just before or after the appearance of the faint solar corona with a brief ring of light and glimpse of Sun. In this scene from the end of totality at Central, South Carolina, clouds drift near the Sun's diamond ring in the sky. via NASA http://ift.tt/2iukDqO

A World of Snowy Dunes on Mars


It was spring in the Northern hemisphere when this image was taken on May 21, 2017, by the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Over the winter, snow and ice have inexorably covered the dunes. Unlike on Earth, this snow and ice is carbon dioxide, better known to us as dry ice. via NASA http://ift.tt/2wBqmRy

The Eagle and The Swan


The Eagle Nebula and the Swan Nebula span this broad starscape, a telescopic view toward the Sagittarius spiral arm and the center of our Milky Way galaxy. The Eagle, also known as M16, is at top and M17, the Swan, at bottom of the frame showing the cosmic clouds as brighter regions of active star-formation. They lie along the spiral arm suffused with reddish emission charactistic of atomic hydrogen gas, and dusty dark nebulae. M17, also called the Omega Nebula, is about 5500 light-years away, while M16 is some 6500 light-years distant. The center of both nebulae are locations of well-known close-up images of star formation from the Hubble Space Telescope. In this mosaic image that extends about 3 degrees across the sky, narrowband, high-resultion image data has been used to enhance the central regions of the Eagle and Swan. The extended wings of the Eagle Nebula spread almost 120 light-years. The Swan is over 30 light-years across. via NASA http://ift.tt/2wnvqbS

Final: Giants 4 Brewers 2. WP: SF H Strickland (3-3) LP: MIL J Barnes (3-4) SV: SF S Dyson (12) (ESPN)

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The Eclipse 2017 Umbra Viewed from Space


As millions of people across the United States experienced a total eclipse as the umbra, or moon’s shadow passed over them, only six people witnessed the umbra from space. The space station crossed the path of the eclipse three times as it orbited above the continental United States at an altitude of 250 miles. via NASA http://ift.tt/2v5PxeW

Final: Brewers 4 Giants 3. WP: MIL J Jeffress (2-2) LP: SF A Suarez (0-3) SV: MIL C Knebel (27) (ESPN)

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The Crown of the Sun


During a total solar eclipse, the Sun's extensive outer atmosphere, or corona, is an inspirational sight. Streamers and shimmering features visible to the eye span a brightness range of over 10,000 to 1, making them notoriously difficult to capture in a single photograph. But this composite of telescopic images covers a wide range of exposure times to reveal the crown of the Sun in all its glory. The aligned and stacked digital frames were taken in clear skies above Stanley, Idaho in the Sawtooth Mountains during the Sun's total eclipse on August 21. A pinkish solar prominence extends just beyond the right edge of the solar disk. Even small details on the dark night side of the New Moon can be made out, illuminated by sunlight reflected from a Full Earth. via NASA http://ift.tt/2vluL61

Giants: Hunter Pence (hamstring) scratched from Tuesday's game vs. Brewers (ESPN)

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Saturn-lit Tethys


Cassini gazes across the icy rings of Saturn toward the icy moon Tethys, whose night side is illuminated by Saturnshine, or sunlight reflected by the planet. via NASA http://ift.tt/2w11uQk

Final: Giants 2 Brewers 0. WP: SF C Stratton (2-2) LP: MIL Z Davies (14-7) SV: SF S Dyson (11) (ESPN)

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A Total Solar Eclipse over Wyoming


Will the sky be clear enough to see the eclipse? This question was on the minds of many people attempting to view yesterday's solar eclipse. The path of total darkness crossed the mainland of the USA from coast to coast, from Oregon to South Carolina -- but a partial eclipse occurred above all of North America. Unfortunately, many locations saw predominantly clouds. One location that did not was a bank of Green River Lake, Wyoming. There, clouds blocked the Sun intermittantly up to one minute before totality. Parting clouds then moved far enough away to allow the center image of the featured composite sequence to be taken. This image shows the corona of the Sun extending out past the central dark Moon that blocks our familiar Sun. The surrounding images show the partial phases of the solar eclipse both before and after totality. via NASA http://ift.tt/2wwYk9l

Glory of the Heavens


This composite image shows the progression of a partial solar eclipse over Ross Lake, in Northern Cascades National Park, Washington on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. via NASA http://ift.tt/2v8Z9Bi

Milky Way over Chilean Volcanoes


Sometimes, the sky mimics the ground. Taken in 2017 May from the Atacama Desert in Chile, the foreground of the featured image encompasses the dipping edge of the caldera of an extinct volcano. Poetically echoing the dip below is the arch of our Milky Way Galaxy above. Many famous icons dot this southern nighttime vista, including the center of our Milky Way Galaxy on the far left, the bright orange star Antares also on the left, the constellation of the Southern Cross near the top of the arch, and the red-glowing Gum Nebula on the far right. Just above the horizon and splitting two distant volcanic peaks near the image center is the Large Magellanic Cloud -- the largest satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. via NASA http://ift.tt/2vPgYrT

Giants eliminated from winning NL West title after Sunday's 5-2 loss to Phillies (ESPN)

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Final: Phillies 5 Giants 2. WP: PHI A Morgan (2-1) LP: SF H Strickland (2-3) SV: PHI H Neris (15) (ESPN)

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Final: Giants 10 Phillies 2. WP: SF M Moore (4-12) LP: PHI Z Eflin (1-5) (ESPN)

from ESPN http://ift.tt/1dPqUAn

Total Solar Eclipse of 1979


From cold, clear skies over Riverton, Manitoba, Canada, planet Earth, the solar corona surrounds the silhouette of the New Moon in this telescopic snapshot of the total solar eclipse of February 26, 1979. Thirty eight years ago, it was the last total solar eclipse visible from the contiguous United States. The narrow path of totality ran through the northwestern states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and North Dakota before crossing into Canadian provinces Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec. Following the upcoming August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse crossing the U.S. from coast to coast, an annular solar eclipse will be seen in the continental United States on October 14, 2023, visible along a route from Northern California to Florida. Then, the next total solar eclipse to touch the continental U.S. will track across 13 states from from Texas to Maine on April 8, 2024. via NASA http://ift.tt/2v7zND7

Atlas V Rocket and TDRS-M


As the Sun rises at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket vents liquid oxygen propellant vapors during fueling for the lift off of NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, TDRS-M. via NASA http://ift.tt/2uPitaN